SUNDAYS AT 10:30 AM

For the fourth week of Advent we focused in on the peace that we have in Jesus! Below is a reading we adapted from an Advent Devotional that The Village Church put out in 2015.

The King is coming. Jesus Christ has come and will come again. This is the hope of the Church whom He purchased with His blood. Today we light the candle that represents peace.  Jesus’ coming is the eager expectation and desire of His people. It is our joy because He is our treasure and greatest good.

Genesis 3:15 says, “I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and her offspring; he shall bruise your heard, and you shall bruise his heel.”

We refer to this verse as the proto evangelion or the “first gospel.” From the first moment of our need for rescue, God’s promise was there. Before He addressed Adam and Eve, God turned to the serpent and announced that sin would not have the final say and that the schemes of the enemy would not prevail.

Throughout the old testament, God spoke to His people about this promise and gave them things to watch for in order to recognize the Savior’s coming. God revealed that the Messiah would be born in the line of David, of the tribe of Judah and in the town of Bethlehem.

God also reminded His people not to lose heart as they waited for the Savior to come. It’s important to remember that God did not fulfill His promise right away. His people waited a long time. They spoke of the promised Rescuer from generation to generation, enduring cycles of war, rebellion, captivity, and restoration. They watched and waited—anxiously, expectantly—for God’s faithfulness.

We can all identify with feeling hopeless, helpless and in desperate need of rescue, especially when it comes to the weight of sin. Heavy and inescapable, we know its effects with every breath—both our own sin and that of others. Our world is full of evidence that something is wrong and needs to be made right. The reason we celebrate Advent is because the story of the Garden doesn’t end with man’s rebellion—but instead his redemption.